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Gabriel Kreindler
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
gek@mit.edu
Gabriel Kreindler is a doctoral candidate in the economics department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His interests include urban transportation, technology and development, and diffusion of information and behaviour. His current research projects include an experimental simulation of road congestion pricing in Delhi, and an analysis of urban commuting patterns using mobile phone transaction data from Sri Lanka. He has worked for various projects with the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) and Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) since 2011, in Morocco, Indonesia and India. He is a Research Fellow at the Sri Lanka based think tank LIRNEasia. He holds a Bachelor's degree in mathematics from Princeton University and an M.Phil. in economics from the University of Oxford.
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Articles By Gabriel Kreindler
Driving restrictions in Delhi: Real benefits and warning signs
Posted On: 15 Jun 2016


The driving restrictions policy that Delhi experimented with in January was implemented for a second time in April for a fortnight. This column finds that the policy lowered traffic congestion; the impact was notable in size and consistent over the two rounds. However, drivers managed to partly circumvent the policy legally, and the policy caused some disruption to economic activity.
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Driving Delhi: The impact of driving restrictions on driver behaviour
Posted On: 08 Feb 2016


In an attempt to address Delhi’s grave pollution problem, the state government experimented with a driving restrictions policy for a fortnight in January. Based on a phone survey of a sample of 614 drivers in the city, this column describes how the policy changed drivers’ behaviour in terms of labour supply, number of daily trips, travel modes, and satisfaction, between restricted and unrestricted days while the policy was in effect.
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