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S. Subramanian| Ideas for India

S. Subramanian
Indian Council of Social Science Research
ssubramanianecon@gmail.com


S. Subramanian is a retired professor from the Madras Institute of Development Studies (MIDS), and an Indian Council of Social Science Research National Fellow. He is an elected Fellow of the Human Development and Capabilities Association, and a member of the advisory board of the World Bank’s Commission on Global Poverty. His work has been on aspects of social and economic measurement, collective choice theory, and development economics. He is the author of, among other books, Rights, Deprivation, and Disparity: Essays in Concepts and Measurement; The Poverty Line; and Economic Offences (Oxford University Press, Delhi: 2006, 2012 and 2013 respectively).   
 

Articles By S. Subramanian
The ‘poverty line’ – III
Posted On: 27 May 2016


In the last of a three-part series on the poverty line, Prof. S. Subramanian, former National Fellow, Indian Council of Social Science Research, discusses how the official methodology of poverty measurement in India has thrown the door open to anarchy.
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The ‘poverty line’ – II
Posted On: 26 May 2016


In the second of a three-part series on the poverty line, Prof. S. Subramanian, former National Fellow, Indian Council of Social Science Research, argues that there is a built-in incentive for official poverty lines to be pitched ‘low’.
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The ‘poverty line’ – I
Posted On: 25 May 2016


In the first of a three-part series on the poverty line, Prof. S. Subramanian, former National Fellow, Indian Council of Social Science Research, contends that the term should not be bandied about frivolously.
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The coexistence of prosperity and poverty in India
Posted On: 21 Oct 2015

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Credit Suisse recently reported that the richest 10% Indians own about 75% of the country’s wealth, highlighting the growing problem of inequality. This column presents trends in inequality in India during 1961-62 – 2002-03 based on relative, absolute and intermediate measures. It demonstrates that growth may be considered inclusive or exclusive depending on the measure of inequality used.
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