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Jonah Busch | Ideas for India

Jonah Busch
Center for Global Development
jbusch@cgdev.org
Jonah Busch is a research fellow at the Center for Global Development. He is an environmental economist whose research focuses on the economics of climate change and tropical deforestation.

Busch is the lead developer of the OSIRIS suite of open-source software tools for mapping the benefits and costs of alternative policy decisions for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). His scientific publications on climate and forests have appeared in academic journals including Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Land Economics, PLoS Biology, Environmental Research Letters, Conservation Letters, Environmental Science and Policy, and Carbon Management. He has also published on the economics of penguins, pandas, and surfers. He serves on the editorial board of Conservation Letters.

Busch has advised on climate and forests for the President of Guyana, the governments of Norway, Indonesia, Bolivia, Suriname, Colombia, the United Kingdom, and California, the Global Environment Facility, and the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility. 

Busch served in the Peace Corps (Burkina Faso, ‘00-‘02) as a high school math teacher. Prior to joining CGDev, Busch was the Climate and Forest Economist at Conservation International. He speaks French, Spanish, Indonesian, and Mooré with varying degrees of proficiency and has traveled in more than sixty-five countries.  
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Articles By Jonah Busch
Incentivising states to conserve forests
Posted On: 11 May 2015

Topics:   Environment

Central tax revenues will now be shared among states not just on the basis of population, area, and income, but also forest cover. In this article, Jonah Busch, an environmental economist at the Center for Global Development, contends that the fiscal reform has the potential to become quite a potent climate instrument. It can serve as an example for other countries with similar tax revenue distribution systems and high rates of deforestation.
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