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Ideas for India | Anit Mukherjee

Anit Mukherjee
Center for Global Development
amukherjee@cgdev.org
Anit Mukherjee is an IDRC fellow at the Center for Global Development. His research focuses on financing and delivery of public services in developing countries. Before joining CGD in December 2014, Mukherjee was an associate professor at the National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, a think tank linked to India’s Ministry of Finance, where he conducted research and policy advocacy to improve efficiency and effectiveness of public expenditure in education and health. He has designed financial management system for national development programmes, undertaken large-scale surveys in public expenditure tracking, and worked as a trainer for government, nonprofit, and international organisations on policy analysis and reform. Mukherjee has previously worked at the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington D.C. and as an adviser to the Government of Yemen.

Articles By Anit Mukherjee
New Education Policy: Putting money where learning is
Posted On: 25 Nov 2015

Topics:   Education
Tags:   schooling

More public expenditure on elementary education in India in recent years has not translated into better learning outcomes of schoolchildren. In this article, Anit Mukherjee from the Center for Global Development, contends that the defining legacy of the New Education Policy should be to redesign public finance and delivery systems in education to focus on learning and reward good performance.

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Getting centre-state relations right for health in India
Posted On: 01 Apr 2015


The 14th Finance Commission has recommended devolving a greater share of revenues to states in order to give them more control over spending. In this article, Amanda Glassman and Anit Mukherjee examine the current centre-state relationships in the context of the health sector in India. They recommend that centre-to-state transfers should be performance-related, and should seek to, at least partly, level the playing field across states.
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