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Kaushik Basu
World Bank
kbasu@worldbank.org
Kaushik Basu is Senior Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank. He is the second Chief Economist from a developing country and the first Indian. Prior to this, he served as Chief Economic Adviser to the Government of India and is currently on leave from Cornell where he is Professor of Economics and the C. Marks Professor of International Studies. Prof. Basu holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the London School of Economics, and is a Fellow of the Econometric Society. He received India’s Padma Bhushan award and the National Mahalanobis Memorial award. His contributions span development economics, welfare economics, industrial organization and game theory. He has taught at the Delhi School of Economics, Harvard, Princeton and MIT, and published widely in refereed journals, scholarly volumes, magazines and newspapers. He has authored several books including Beyond the Invisible Hand.

Articles By Kaushik Basu
A conversation on development – II
Posted On: 03 Feb 2016


Parikshit Ghosh (Associate Professor of Economics, Delhi School of Economics) speaks with Kaushik Basu (Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, World Bank and former Chief Economic Adviser, Government of India) on issues ranging from the use of economic knowledge in policy decisions, role of values in public service delivery, to the need for pluralism and tolerance for economic growth, and the importance of communicating good ideas effectively to policymakers and the general public.

This part of the interview focuses on India-specific issues. This is the fourth in the series of I4I Conversations.

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A conversation on development - I
Posted On: 03 Feb 2016


Parikshit Ghosh (Associate Professor of Economics, Delhi School of Economics) speaks with Kaushik Basu (Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, World Bank and former Chief Economic Adviser, Government of India) on issues ranging from the change in World Bank’s mission and its engagement with the world, rising inequality in the developed world, managing the negative side effects of growth, to the role of behavioural economics and paternalism in development, and the exclusionary nature of the ongoing digital revolution.

This part of the interview focuses on global issues. This is the fourth in the series of I4I Conversations.

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India, China and growth forecasts
Posted On: 02 Dec 2015

Topics:   Economic Growth
Tags:   China

The World Bank and IMF have predicted that India’s growth rate would overtake that of China in 2015-16. In this article, Kaushik Basu, Senior Vice President and Chief Economist at the World Bank, contends that the resulting high expectations for India lie not in the growth crossover – which is not as significant as some make it out to be – but in the dynamics underlying the country’s aggregate numbers.
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Big and small ideas in development economics: Theory, evidence and practice
Posted On: 03 Feb 2015


Karthik Muralidharan, Associate Professor of Economics, University of California, San Diego speaks with Kaushik Basu, Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, World Bank and former Chief Economic Adviser, Government of India, on the World Bank’s global development agenda; inequality and the design of anti-poverty policies; contribution of recent academic research to development policy; research evidence, political economy and policymaking; State capacity for implementation; and law and economics.
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From tapering to tightening: The impact of the Fed’s exit on India
Posted On: 27 Nov 2014

Tags:   US

India was among the hardest hit by the Fed’s ‘taper talks’. This column argues that this impact was large for two reasons. First, India received huge capital flows before. This had made it a convenient target for investors seeking to rebalance away from emerging markets. Second, macroeconomic conditions had worsened, which rendered the economy vulnerable. The measures adopted in response were ineffective in stabilising the financial markets. Implementing a medium-term framework that limits vulnerabilities and restricts spillovers could be more successful.
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