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Ambrish Dongre | Ideas for India

Ambrish Dongre
Centre for Policy Research
ambrish@cprindia.org
Ambrish Dongre is a fellow at Centre for Policy Research (CPR), New Delhi. He studies education and health. His most recent work focuses on the implementation of government programmes to improve learning outcomes in government schools,private tutoring and learning, and implementation of section 12(1)(C) of the Right to Education (RTE) Act, which mandates 25% reservation in private unaided schools for children from economically and socially weaker sections. Currently, he is also involved in conducting a series of time-use studies of education officials. Prior to this, Ambrish managed quantitative research for the CPR-based Accountability Initiative (AI), overseeing sample and survey design and data analysis. At AI,he led a study of 20 Gram Panchayats in Birbhum, West Bengal to track the flow of funds at the Gram Panchayat level, titled Do GPs get their Money?,and was instrumental in bringing out one of AI’s flagship publications, the PAISA Report, for three consecutive years. He was involved in PAISA District Reports which provide a snapshot of fund flows, implementation processes, and analysis of bottlenecks at the ground level in Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA) and Mid Day Meal (MDM) schemes. He continues to be associated with AI as a senior researcher. Ambrish holds a Ph.D.in economics from the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), and a Masters in economics from the University of Mumbai.

Articles By Ambrish Dongre
Reservation under RTE: Status of implementation and way forward
Posted On: 11 Jan 2016

Topics:   Education

Section 12(1)(c) of the Right to Education Act, 2009, mandates that non-minority private unaided schools should reserve at least 25% of seats in entry-level grades for children from economically weaker and disadvantaged backgrounds. This column analyses the current status of implementation of this provision, and suggests ways to overcome hindrances in effective implementation and make the education system more inclusive.

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Education reform and frontline administrators: A case study from Bihar – II
Posted On: 16 Oct 2015


The frontline administration in India is infamous for corruption and patronage, indifference towards citizens, low effort and high absenteeism. This column reports findings from a year-long qualitative study on frontline education administrators in Bihar. Part 1 captured perspectives of frontline administrators on their role in the education hierarchy and how organisational design and culture shapes everyday behaviour. This part offers insights into how the frontline responds to reform efforts, and how this impacts institutionalisation and scaling up of reforms.

This is the second of a two-part series.

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Education reform and frontline administrators: A case study from Bihar - I
Posted On: 15 Oct 2015


The frontline administration in India is infamous for corruption and patronage, indifference towards citizens, low effort and high absenteeism. This column reports findings from a year-long qualitative study on frontline education administrators in Bihar. It captures perspectives of frontline administrators on their role in the education hierarchy and how organisational design and culture shape everyday behaviour.

This is the first of a two-part series.

read on »

How much does India spend on elementary education?
Posted On: 02 Feb 2015

Topics:   Education

There has been a significant policy focus on expanding elementary education in India in recent years. Yet, estimates of public and private expenditure on elementary education are not available. This column seeks to fill this gap by estimating annual public expenditure per student in government schools, and annual private expenditure per student for those enrolled in private schools, for 16 selected states in India.
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Do private tuitions improve learning outcomes?
Posted On: 13 Aug 2014

Topics:   Education
Tags:   schooling

About a fourth of the students enrolled in elementary schools in rural India attend private tuitions. This column analyses the impact of private tuition on learning outcomes, and finds that it has a large, positive effect on math and language test scores. The impact is greater for those who are more disadvantaged in terms of learning levels, household’s socio-economic status, and education of parents.
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