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Himanshu
Jawaharlal Nehru University
himansu2@gmail.com
Himanshu is Assistant Professor of Economics at Centre for Study of Regional Development, School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. He is also visiting fellow at Centre de Sciences Humaines, New Delhi. Prior to joining JNU, he has been a research fellow in economics at the Centre de Sciences Humaines and C R Parekh fellow at Asia Research Centre of the London School of Economics. His areas of research include issues related to poverty, inequality, employment, food security and agrarian change. He has been involved with various government committees including Expert Group on Measurement of Poverty (Tendulkar committee), National Statistical Commission and Ministry of Rural Development. Himanshu writes a fortnightly column on issues related to development in MINT. Himanshu has received the Sanjay Thakur Young Economist Award of the Indian Society of Labour Economics and Personnalité d’ Avenir of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Himanshu received his Ph.D. in Economics from Jawaharlal Nehru University.

Articles By Himanshu
Insights from long-term studies of Indian villages
Posted On: 23 Sep 2016


Much of our knowledge of change in rural areas depends on longitudinal village studies. Drawing upon a number of village studies carried out over the years in India, this column provides a broad picture of how the economic and social structures of villages are changing, and the consequences for production, employment, migration, inequality and other key issues.
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Is India a tax haven for the rich?
Posted On: 10 Aug 2016


In April, the government released tax data, which provided a break-up of taxes by income categories for the year 2012-13. In this article, Himanshu, Associate Professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University, contends that by increasing tax exemptions and subsidies for the wealthy, and through various tax giveaways, the government has reduced its capacity to spend more on essential sectors such as health, nutrition and education.
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Walking the poverty line
Posted On: 20 Jul 2012


As India’s Planning Commission seeks to review its measurement of poverty, the issue has become a hot topic for public debate. This column argues that while poverty lines should be used as benchmarks for policy, they should not be used to decide who receives benefits and who doesn’t – nor should they distract us from the real issues of poverty.
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