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Utteeyo Dasgupta
Wagner College, New York
utteeyo.dasgupta@wagner.edu
Utteeyo Dasgupta is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Wagner College. He received a B.A. (honors) in economics from Delhi University; M.A. in economics from Jawaharlal Nehru University; a second M.A. in economics from University of Arizona, and a Ph.D. in economics from University of Arizona. He primarily uses laboratory and field experiments along with game theory to evaluate and understand the positive, normative and strategic aspects of economic decision-making. His scholarly work has been published in Economic Theory, B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy and other peer-reviewed journals. Details of his current research and publications are available on his website.s been published in Economic Theory, B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy and other peer-reviewed journals. Details of his current research and publications are available on his website.
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Articles By Utteeyo Dasgupta
Do wives care more about household welfare than husbands?
Posted On: 24 Feb 2014

Topics:   Gender
Tags:   consumption

Social science literature shows that women promote household welfare more than men. This column examines if consumption choices of husbands and wives change, depending on whether they have to work to earn the money that they are spending. It is found that wives’ preferences for joint household consumption remain largely independent of whether they work to earn the money, or receive it without working.
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Choosing to be trained: Behavioural restrictions on participation decisions
Posted On: 02 Sep 2013

Topics:   Jobs
Tags:   training

Widespread unemployment has prompted policymakers to consider introduction of various training programmes that can help workers accumulate additional skills to obtain new jobs and/ or retain current ones. However, these programmes can only help if targeted individuals take up such opportunities. This column argues that participation in short-term skill-building courses is not just limited by economic factors but is also influenced by intrinsic characteristics such as attitudes towards risk and competition.
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