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Devesh Kapur
University of Pennsylvania
dkapur@sas.upenn.edu
DeveshKapur is the MadanLalSobti Associate Professor for the Study of Contemporary India, Director, Center for Advanced Study of India, University of Pennsylvania and Non-Resident fellow at the Center for Global Development, Washington D.C. Prior to joining the University of Pennsylvania he held appointments at the Brookings Institution, Harvard University and University of Texas, Austin. He is the coauthor of The World Bank: Its First Half Century; Give us your Best and Brightest: The Global Hunt for Talent and Its Impact on the Developing World; Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. His most recent book Diaspora, Democracy and Development: The Impact of International Migration from India on India published by Princeton University Press received the 2012 Distinguished Book Award of the Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Migration Section of International Studies Association. He has a B.Tech. and M.S. in chemical engineering and a Ph.D. in Public Policy from Princeton University.
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Articles By Devesh Kapur
Land-shackled - II
Posted On: 22 Oct 2014

Topics:   Land

Rising land scarcity and land market distortions are increasingly becoming a binding constraint on development in India. In their previous article, Kapur, Somanathan and Subramanian diagnosed India’s land problem. In this part, they propose policy reforms for addressing the problem and ensuring that land facilitates rather than impedes development.
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Land-shackled
Posted On: 17 Oct 2014

Topics:   Land

Rising land scarcity and land market distortions are increasingly becoming a binding constraint on development in India. In the first of a two-part series, Kapur, Somanathan and Subramanian diagnose India’s land problem. In the next part, they propose policy reforms for addressing the problem and ensuring that land facilitates rather than impedes development.
read on »

Why taxing property is essential for local government accountability
Posted On: 03 Mar 2014


With rapid decentralisation and urbanisation, wealth is increasingly vested and locked up in land and property in India. In their previous article, Kapur and Subramanian emphasised the importance of direct taxes in ensuring citizen participation in holding the government accountable. In this part, they recommend that the 14th Finance Commission should promote tax decentralisation by incentivising state and local government to increase the property tax net.
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Taxation´s fatal neglect?
Posted On: 14 Feb 2014


Today, the public discourse on government finances in India is largely focused on spending. This article emphasises the importance of taxes, particularly income tax, in ensuring citizen participation in holding the government accountable. It shows that while economic growth in the past decade was faster than in preceding years, expansion of the direct tax net slowed down.
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India's unique crisis – a short term fix
Posted On: 20 Dec 2013


While the current turbulence in the Indian economy bears a resemblance to the situation of other emerging economies, it is unique when compared with historical experiences of economic crises. In their previous article, Kapur and Subramanian discussed the misdiagnosis of India’s crisis, and consequent errors in policy remedies. In this part, they outline short-term actions for reversing the growth slowdown, reducing current account deficit and preventing inflation.
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India's unique crisis
Posted On: 16 Dec 2013


While the current turbulence in the Indian economy bears a resemblance to the situation of other emerging economies, it is unique when compared with historical experiences of economic crises. In the first of a two-part article, Kapur and Subramanian discuss the misdiagnoses of India’s crisis, and the consequent errors in policy remedies. In the next part, the authors provide a short-term solution for India’s unique crisis.
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