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Anandi Mani
University of Warwick
A.Mani@warwick.ac.uk
Anandi Mani is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Warwick. She also functions as Capacity Building Fellow at the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) in the U.K. Her research interests lie in the area of development economics, with an emphasis on issues related to the psychology of poverty, gender and political economy. Her ongoing projects on poverty focus on its impact on cognitive abilities, decision-making and aspirations. She has also been working on political economy issues related to public good outcomes in India, including the division of authority between politicians and bureaucrats and the impact of female political representation. Her field work in India has been carried out in several states including Andhra Pradesh, Orissa, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal. She is currently a consultant to the World Bank on projects related to politics, gender and development. Dr Mani has a Ph.D. in Economics from Boston University.

Articles By Anandi Mani
The power of women’s political voice
Posted On: 17 Jun 2013


With more women in power, can India’s women expect to see a fall in violent crime committed against them? This column looks at the effect of a law to mandate minimum numbers for women in public office – its findings are both surprising and encouraging.
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The Transfer Raj
Posted On: 01 Aug 2012

Topics:   Political Economy
Tags:   bureaucracy

When Chief Ministers come to power in India, they extensively reshuffle civil servants postings. This column asks why state politicians transfer bureaucrats, whether they favour loyalty over competence, what this means for the administrative efficiency of the Indian state, and what can be done about it.
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