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Saurabh Mishra
International Monetary Fund
SMishra2@imf.org
Saurabh Mishra works at the International Monetary Fund’s Research Department on matters related to Jobs and Growth. As an economist, he regularly writes on international and development economic topics including inclusive growth, structural transformation, technology, poverty reduction, public finance and macroeconomic policy. He advises the World Bank’s Open Government Initiative and is actively engaged at the intersection of product innovation and capital markets to help social entrepreneurs in emerging markets. 

Prior to joining the IMF Research Department, he worked at the World Bank’s South Asia Poverty Reduction Economic Management (PREM), International Trade Department, Chief Economist Office Europe and Central Asia; he has also consulted the IMF’s Africa Department, as well as the Agriculture and Commodities Division of the World Trade Organization. 

He contributed to several books including The Poor Half Billion in South Asia, Oxford University Press 2010; The Service Revolution in South Asia, Oxford University Press 2010; South Asia Economic Update: Moving Up Looking East, World Bank 2010. 

After growing up and schooling in Jamshedpur, India, he received his Bachelors and Masters in International Economics and Finance from the University of California, Santa Cruz. 


Articles By Saurabh Mishra
Boosting shared prosperity in South Asia
Posted On: 04 Mar 2013


Two-thirds of the poor in India and other South Asian countries live in the lagging regions. This column examines whether there are poverty traps that make it difficult to achieve shared prosperity, and if the current fiscal decentralisation arrangements in South Asia are working to the benefit of the poor regions. It highlights the need for shifting the locus of policy from the national to sub-national level, and from leading to lagging regions.
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