Do the poor need genetically modified crops?
Milind Murugkar
Posted on: 22 Nov 2013

Field trials of a few genetically modified crops were recently put on hold by the Environment Ministry. This article asserts that the decision reflects an ideological resistance to and suspicion about the technology, which is at odds with the government’s stated policy of using GM crops for the benefit of rural poor. It argues that GM crops can go a long way in helping farmers by improving crop yields.
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Indian agriculture: How to feed more people with fewer resources
Gareth Price , Ira Sharma , Ashwini Kumar Swain
Posted on: 05 Jul 2016

While agriculture in India has achieved grain self-sufficiency, it has become cereal-centric, regionally-biased and resource-intensive. In this article, Swain, Price and Sharma discuss the rising resource intensity in Indian agriculture and its implications for agricultural sustainability, productivity and future food production. They explore government initiatives to address the situation and suggest a strategy to increase production with fewer resources.
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Nobel insights: When it comes to contracts, what’s obvious may not be optimal
Rohini Somanathan
Posted on: 18 Oct 2016

In a tribute to Oliver Hart and Bengt Holmström, recipients of this year’s Nobel prize in Economics, Rohini Somanathan, Professor of Economics at Delhi School of Economics, outlines their contributions.
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Nobel prize in Economics 2016: The economy as a nexus of contracts
Maitreesh Ghatak
Posted on: 19 Oct 2016
Tags:   management

An important line of research in microeconomics has tried to explain how the economic institutions that underpin the ‘invisible hand of the market’ actually work. The specific economic institution that Hart and Holmström focus on is contracts. In a tribute to the Nobel laureates, Maitreesh Ghatak, Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics, discusses the working and importance of contract theory.
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India’s disputed ruling on pharmaceuticals and patents
Arvind Subramanian
Posted on: 10 Apr 2013

On April 1 2013, the Supreme Court of India rejected the attempt by Novartis, the Swiss pharmaceutical company, to patent a new version of the leukemia drug Glivec. The verdict follows previous rulings that granted compulsory licenses to an Indian generic drug manufacturer for a kidney cancer drug (Nexavar) patented by Bayer. This article discusses five important questions raised by these rulings.
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Assam’s Brahmaputra Community Radio Station: Innovation in health communication
Anjali Mariam Paul
Posted on: 12 May 2017

River Brahmaputra which flows across the Northeast Indian state of Assam, carves out a network of nearly 2,300 islands, isolating them from the mainland and excluding their inhabitants from access to basic infrastructure and health facilities. Based on her fieldwork, Anjali Mariam Paul describes the working of an innovative intervention in health communication – a non-commercial grassroots community radio station for these river islands.
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How new technologies can raise farm productivity
Sambuddha Goswami , Uma Lele
Posted on: 06 Dec 2017

Lele and Goswami discuss the potential of new technologies in raising farm productivity, and the challenges involved in turning the power of information and other technologies into a farmer-friendly technological revolution.
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I4I Panel Discussion: The challenge of job creation
Kaushik Basu , Renana Jhabvala , Ashok Kotwal , Pronab Sen
Posted on: 30 Jan 2018

In a recent I4I editorial, Ashok Kotwal described the challenge of job creation that is facing the Indian economy today. In December 2017, Prof. Kotwal moderated a panel discussion on the topic between Kaushik Basu (Cornell University), Renana Jhabvala (SEWA), and Pronab Sen (IGC India). The panellists presented their views on issues including raising productivity of the unorganised sector; role of manufacturing and services in job creation; impact of automation and artificial intelligence; and binding constraints on growth of the organised sector.

Video and summary of the discussion are available here.

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Podcast: Parikshit Ghosh speaks with Debraj Ray
Parikshit Ghosh , Debraj Ray
Posted on: 13 Feb 2018

In this podcast, I4I Editor Parikshit Ghosh (Associate Professor, Delhi School of Economics) speaks with Debraj Ray (Julius Silver Professor, Faculty of Arts and Science, and Professor of Economics, New York University) on the rise of Trump and how it relates to the upsurge of inequality in the US and the ‘American dream’ narrative; implications of the process of automation for the relative shares of capital and labour as factors of production; the idea of committing a share of gross domestic product for the provision of a universal basic income; and the challenges involved in addressing inequality of wealth.
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Introduction to e-Symposium: Firms and labour productivity
Farzana Afridi
Posted on: 12 Mar 2018

Eighty per cent of India’s labour force works ‘informally’. Providing employment with decent wages and benefits to this segment requires structural transformation of the economy to more high-productivity sectors. I4I Editor Farzana Afridi is hosting an e-symposium to bring together some fundamental issues around the challenge of raising labour and firm productivity in the country.

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