Education
 
Micro-innovations in education
Sharath Jeevan , James Townsend
Posted on: 17 Jul 2013

The poor quality of school teachers is widely acknowledged as a major obstacle to the educational success of children from low income families. STIR Education visited and spoke to over 3,000 teachers in government and affordable private schools in New Delhi and compiled a list of replicable micro-innovations suggested by them. The exercise demonstrates that if given the opportunity, teachers can be a part of the solution, rather than a barrier to education reform.
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Searching for the ‘silver bullet’: What works in improving children’s learning outcomes?
Rukmini Banerji
Posted on: 06 Jan 2014
Topics:   Education
Tags:   schooling

Children’s learning outcomes in primary schools in India are far from satisfactory. In this article, Rukmini Banerji explores the various theories of change and associated implementation strategies that are currently at work for improving the status of learning in schools. She discusses the challenges of balancing and prioritising the different theories of change, and translating them into practice on scale.
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The push and pull of skilling
Madhav Chavan
Posted on: 22 Mar 2013
Tags:   training

Vocational training has been centre-stage in policy discussions in India over the past decade. This article discusses the perspectives of and dissatisfaction among the four groups of stakeholders in skill training – government, industry, trainers and potential trainees. It highlights the need for a strong “pull” or demand for training and suggests innovative ways to achieve this.
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Building a movement, assessment to action
Rukmini Banerji
Posted on: 23 Sep 2015
Topics:   Education
Tags:   schooling

While citizen-led assessments of children’s learning have been applauded for building awareness around the issue, observers have pointed out that information does not automatically galvanise action. In this article, Rukmini Banerji, of the education NGO Pratham, contends that citizen-led assessments can lead to citizen-led action for improving learning by making the problem visible, engaging with people, and demonstrating how change can be brought about.
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Education for all: Fixing classroom processes
Amarjeet Sinha
Posted on: 11 Jun 2014
Topics:   Education

While India has achieved near universal enrolment in schools, the quality of education is far from satisfactory. There is an urgent need to change classroom processes to ensure that those who go to school actually learn. In this article, former Principal Secretary, Department of Education, Government of Bihar outlines various initiatives undertaken by the state to address this issue, and makes recommendations based on their experience.
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Barriers in accessing applications under RTE quota in Gujarat

Posted on: 11 Oct 2017

In the school year 2017-18, Gujarat shifted from a paper-based system at the district level to an online system at the state level, for applications under the Right to Education Act. In this note, researchers at IIM Ahmedabad demonstrate that unless the required technological infrastructure is adequately developed, a complete shift to digitisation adversely affects the most vulnerable populations.
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Improving children’s learning: Challenges and priorities for the new government
Rukmini Banerji
Posted on: 14 Jul 2014
Topics:   Education
Tags:   schooling

Over the last 15 years, continued effort to universalise access to elementary education in India has resulted in high enrolment rates in schools. Now that most children are in school, policy and planning efforts are beginning to focus on improving their learning levels. This note contends that it is imperative for the new government to maintain, monitor and strengthen this priority and improve mechanisms for achieving learning goals.
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Taking education beyond educationists
Rukmini Banerji
Posted on: 09 Feb 2015
Topics:   Education
Tags:   schooling

ASER – Annual Status of Education Report – has been tracking learning outcomes of children in rural India for the past 10 years. In this note, Rukmini Banerji, Director of the ASER Centre/Pratham, highlights how this model of measurement is different from the traditional models of student assessments seen in India or elsewhere. She also points out key policy changes that have taken place in education in India, at least partly in response to ASER findings.
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