Political Economy
 
Fundamental errors in the voting booth margins
Edward Glaeser , Giacomo Ponzetto
Posted on: 17 Nov 2017
Tags:   democracy

Psychologists have long documented that we over-attribute people's actions to innate characteristics rather than to circumstances. This column shows that when we commit this ‘fundamental attribution error’ as voters; we over-ascribe politicians’ success to personal characteristics that merit re-election. Although this mistake can improve politicians’ incentives in ordinary times, the theory also explains lack of institutional reform and poor institutional choices, such as decreased demand for a free press and preferences for dictatorship.
read on »
Breaking the clientelist trap: Can reform create demand for good governance in Bihar?
Jonathan Phillips
Posted on: 14 Nov 2017
Topics:   Political Economy
Tags:   Bihar

How has over a decade of rapid and programmatic policy reform in Bihar affected voters? Based on a household survey comparing political attitudes of residents on either side of the Bihar-Jharkhand border, this column shows that Bihar’s policy reforms have raised voters’ expectations, but have not yet produced a fundamental change in their willingness to vote against clientelist politicians.
read on »
Doing Business in India: Myths and realities
Matthew Lillehaugen , Milan Vaishnav
Posted on: 25 Oct 2017
Topics:   Political Economy

Ahead of the global release of the 2018 edition of the World Bank Doing Business rankings, this column compares data from firm-level surveys conducted by the Bank and the IDFC Institute-NITI Aayog with the Bank’s Doing Business reports on India for the years 2014 and 2016.
read on »
The power of enforcement: State capacity and child marriage in India
Tanushree Goyal , Sam van Noort
Posted on: 24 Oct 2017
Tags:  

In an attempt to deter child marriage, a recent Supreme Court verdict has criminalised sexual relations between a man and minor wife. Worldwide, more than 700 million women alive today were married before their 18th birthday, and one in three child brides are in India. Analysing data from the India Human Development Survey, this column demonstrates that strong State capacity can play a significant role in reducing child marriage.
read on »
Political reservation and the quality of governance
Siwan Anderson , Patrick Francois
Posted on: 23 Oct 2017

Existing evidence suggests that while political reservation for traditionally marginalised groups tilts governance outcomes in favour of those groups, there are non-discernable or negative effects on the overall quality of governance. This column demonstrates that in a divided society like that of village India, where politics is organised along identity lines, reservation could indeed improve overall governance quality.
read on »
Three barriers that make it hard for policymakers to use the evidence that development researchers produce
Michael Callen , Adnan Khan , Asim Ijaz Khwaja , Asad Liaqat , Emily Myers
Posted on: 20 Sep 2017
Topics:   Political Economy

There has been a surge in policy research globally over the past two decades that is geared to promote evidence-based policymaking. But can policymakers put this evidence to use? Based on a survey of civil servants in India and Pakistan, this column finds that simply presenting evidence to policymakers doesn’t necessarily improve their decision-making.
read on »
Drawing the line: The short- and long-term consequences of partitioning India
Prashant Bharadwaj , Saumitra Jha
Posted on: 08 Sep 2017

Colonial rule in India culminated in the birth of two nations, forcing the displacement of millions. This column analyses the economic and political consequences of the Partition in 1947. It finds that differences in the distribution of education and organisational skills across communities and the extent to which communities and regions traded with each other, played a key role in shaping the bloody nature of the upheaval during the Partition itself, and its long-term consequences.
read on »
Quota policies and career advancement: Evidence from Indian politics
Stephen D O'Connell
Posted on: 28 Aug 2017

Can quotas for women in politics induce institutional change in the long run? This column examines whether affirmative action for women in Indian local government had spillovers into state and national offices. It finds that reservations in local government may have been responsible for around half of the increase in female candidacy in parliamentary elections since 1991. However, female representation in higher offices remains low.
read on »
Political decentralisation, female leadership, and health in rural Bihar
Santosh Kumar , Nishith Prakash
Posted on: 23 Aug 2017

Political decentralisation and female representation in governance are known to improve social welfare by influencing policy decisions in favour of women and children. Analysing data from rural Bihar, this column finds that having a female leader at the village council level has a strong positive association with institutional births, and child survival rates for richer households.
read on »
The economic and political consequences of India’s demonetisation
Abhijit Banerjee , Namrata Kala
Posted on: 26 Jul 2017

The ruling party at the centre won the Uttar Pradesh state election despite its demonetisation policy having some negative economic impacts on the Indian economy. By combining primary data from surveys of wholesale and retail traders, with secondary data on wholesale markets, this column seeks to analyse why this was so.
read on »
1234567